Tag Archives: Breathing

Meditation Tips to Achieve Peace

Peace of mind is a much sought after element especially in stressful times in our lives, and with a few meditation tips can be easier for anyone to achieve.

The key for using these meditation tips is practice. Set aside at least 5 minutes each day when you will have the opportunity to devote your time to practicing the techniques for meditation. Once you experience the calm attained through meditation, you will no doubt wish to increase the time spent practicing the steps. Do not rush the process. While the peace felt is a very desirable result, more important is your control over achieving the feeling. This control can only be obtained through regular, structured practice.

Finding the ideal spot for you to practice is the first of the meditation tips that will help you achieve peace. A quiet, tranquil location is best for you to devote all of your attention to the task at hand; outside noise and disruptions will prove to be too much distraction for meditation. A comfortable chair, on your bed, or sitting in the traditional cross legged Lotus position with your hands on your knees are all possible positions; the important thing is to feel totally comfortable and at ease. As you become more accomplished at meditation, you will be able to achieve the peace in any location and while in any position. In the beginning, however, it is best to practice breathing techniques in a relaxed sitting position.

One of the best meditation tips is to proceed slowly. A common mistake of many beginners is to think the process is too simple, become impatient and try to rush the techniques. Naturally, this tact does not achieve relaxation. Focusing on perfecting the technique of proper breathing; experiencing each outward breath and inward breath as it occurs brings awareness of how the air affects your body and your consciousness.

Proper breathing is the very foundation of meditation. Tips for mastering the technique include being totally aware of the importance of each breath. With every exhale, imagine that every worry, anxiety and troubled thought is being escorted out of your mind on that breath; expelled out into the world. Every inhale brings a flow of joy and tranquility into your body; occupying the space where worry once lived. Each breath carries with it a great deal of responsibility, so must be done correctly. Close your eyes so that you are able to focus inward. Imagine that your body becomes emptier of stress with each exhale, to be replaced with calm serenity with each inhale. Start with your feet, working up until finally the peace reaches your mind. You should now feel totally relaxed.

Using these meditation tips will help you attain the peace of mind needed in these stressful times. Practice them faithfully to get the best results in your life.

Source by Sara Le

Walking Meditation for Fitness of Mind and Body

Walking meditation is a form of meditation that not a lot of people really know all that much about. Sure, we all know that it can be peaceful to go out for a walk, and that some people seem to be in an almost trance like state as they wander around the streets and parks, but it really can be a good way to just exercise your mind and body at the same time.

In this article we’re going to look at what a walking meditation routine actually is, how we get into a state of meditation while out walking, and finally we’ll see how a routine of meditating while we’re walking can be of benefit to us.

What is walking meditation?

In its simplest form a walking meditation routine is one where a person is able to put themselves into a meditative state while they are out walking. This is quite different to other meditative states that require the person to remain as inactive as possible in order to achieve the state of peace and bliss that they’re looking for.

How can we achieve this state while out walking?

Most people will find this to be a challenge because they won’t be able to find all that many areas, especially in the inner cities, where they will be able to stroll around without the sounds of cars, or constant background sound of a normal residential road. Don’t worry about it. In fact, this urban soundtrack can actually aid in the meditation process.

To meditate you normally have to shut out the rest of the world, if you’re doing a normal meditation, this isn’t too much of a problem, but, if you have the relentless din of other people’s lives going on about you, it will take far more concentration to meditate.

You need to be aware of what’s happening around you (for obvious reasons), but you also need to be able to tune them out. You need to be able to balance the awareness of the world around you, with the world inside of you. If something happens around you and distracts you, acknowledge it, see if it’s something that is a danger to you, and then shift your focus from it if it isn’t.

How will this routine of meditating while walking benefit you?

First of all, you’ll be getting exercise from the walking. Most of us will spend some time walking during the day, so, it makes sense to be able to use this time in two ways: exercising and meditating. We don’t have to try and make time in our busy schedules to sit in a quiet room and meditate because we can, if you like, multitask the two.

You will also be able to focus better on things if you have developed the ability to tune out the rest of the world while you’re out walking. If you can do that with people and cars, and yet still have an awareness of your environment, you shouldn’t have any problems when it comes to focusing on tasks in your day to day life.

So, what have we discovered about walking meditation? It’s something that we can do during the times when we have to walk somewhere and probably wouldn’t have been thinking about anything in particular. It will take a lot of concentration and focus do initially, but ultimately it will help us to get fit by walking, and teach us a way to be aware of our surroundings without having them fully occupy our minds.

Get fit in mind and body; start with your walking meditation.

Head on over to this website for more tips on better health and fitness

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Meditation Brings Peace of Mind

Meditation really can help you become peaceful and calm. You can replace your negative and uncomfortable feelings with feelings of well-being naturally with meditation. You can enjoy peace.

Being able to go into a relaxed state any time you want to is a very good thing. But being IN that relaxed state ALL the time is even better. Long before you learn to be relaxed and calm at all times, you will still have many benefits from meditation.

Your heart rate will normalize. Your body will slow down. You will concentrate more easily.

If you continue to practice, there will be a point when you will become an observer. You will be aware of all that is going on around you but will no longer feel distressing emotional and physical reactions. You will be an observer rather than simply reacting without control.

Meditation and “medication” are spelled almost identically. But there are some very important differences.

When you meditate, you are learning to be in control of your body and your mind. It is a form of self-healing; of healthy self-medication. While I would never tell you not to take drugs that your doctor prescribes for you, it is important that you must be aware of the possible side effects. A drug that works for one person may not work for another.

But meditation–that is the natural “drug” that has only positive side effects!

Without going into all of the chemistry of the human body, meditating causes the “feel good” or stress-releasing natural chemicals to be generated in your body. This is the same type of response runners have. They call it “runners’ high.” You can enjoy runners’ high without the need to run!

Meditation is one of the very best ways I know to rid yourself of stress, anxiety and unhappiness. And just about anyone can learn to meditate. There are many ways to bring the peace of meditation into your life.

Some people do use it as part of a religious experience but that is not necessary. Do not let that worry you. You can still enjoy all of the benefits as you do with any other type of exercise.

There is a free Special Report waiting for you. It is called “The Meditation Report: Four Types of Meditation for Peace of Mind.”

You may claim your copy at http://RelaxInto.com Please enjoy it with my compliments.

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Tips on Meditating For a Healthy Mind and Body

Meditation was originally used for spiritual growth, to become more open to and aware of the holy and the guiding presence of the holy. Today, though, meditation has become a valuable tool even for those people who do not consider themselves religious. It can be a source of peace and quiet in a world that is seriously lacking in both.

It can be used for healing, emotional cleansing and balancing, deepening concentration, unlocking creativity, and finding inner guidance.

When you begin your meditation, put your expectations aside, and don’t stress out about the ‘right’ way to do it. There are many ways to meditate and there are no fixed criterion for determining right meditation. What works for you is the right method for you. And finding out what works may require some experimentation and adjustments. I list a number different approaches below.

There are, however, a few things to avoid when you start meditating:

Don’t try to force something to happen.

Don’t over-analyze the meditation

Don’t try to make your mind blank or chase thoughts away

Remember, there is no one “right” way to meditate. Just concentrate on the process and find the best way for YOU!

To start meditating, choose a time and a place where you won’t be disturbed. That in itself may seem like an insurmountable task. Unless you are a hermit, there are probably people in your life demanding your time and attention. You may want to tell these people that you will help them find their socks, get the gum out of their hair, listen to their rants about the people at work, or whatever AFTER you’ve had a few minutes of peace and quiet. Let them know that this is something that you need to do for yourself but they will also benefit because you will be more relaxed, more energetic, and more loving.

When you are starting out, you only need 10 or 15 minutes for your meditation session. This is plenty of time when you are beginning and it may well be that this is all the time that you feel you can pry out of your busy schedule for yourself. That’s fine – it’s much better to spend a few minutes a day meditating than to put it off completely.

Over time, you may find your meditation time so beneficial that you want to increase the amount of time you spend in a meditative state. That’s completely up to you. A good goal is to work up to two 20 minute meditation sessions each day. Research has shown that spending this amount of time meditating leads to better health and can help reduce the stresses and strains of daily life.

The process is helped if you can make it a habit to meditate at about the same time each day. Some people find that meditating first thing in the morning works for them. Other people meditate last thing at night before going to sleep. There is no exact time that is best for everyone. Whatever works for you is good! Just make sure that you practice on a regular basis.

The actual place where you decide to meditate is again up to you. A few people set aside a room in their house as their meditation room but if you’re just starting out, that’s probably a bit too extreme. Instead, you may decide to meditate in your bedroom, the lounge, the kitchen or even the garden – wherever you are least likely to be disturbed. It is, of course, better if you don’t try to meditate in the living room while the rest of the family is watching TV. Other than that the exact place where you meditate doesn’t matter – it’s much more important that you actually start practicing meditation.

If you find that the original place you chose isn’t working for you, don’t be afraid to change it. The same goes for the time and the method that you chose. The ultimate benefit of meditation far exceeds the precise method of meditation that you use to reach the benefit.

One of the easiest ways to start meditating is to use a guided meditation. This is a CD or MP3 that contains all the instructions you need to achieve a state of meditation. All you need to do is to find somewhere that you won’t be disturbed, sit or lie down and play the audio file. Soundstrue.com has many such guided imageries as well as meditation music.

There are many different types of meditation. We’ll cover some of the more common types below but if none of these suit you, you’ll find many more to explore on the internet. Feel free to experiment with some of the different types of meditation explored below until you find one that works well for you.

Centering

Centering is meditation in action. Within you is a space that is always calm and at peace. This space is often referred to as your “calm center”. Being centered means remaining in your calm center amidst the busyness of everyday life. Being centered means not allowing your inner light to be overshadowed by stressful circumstances or negative thoughts and emotions.

When you are centered, you are in a state of clarity, focus, peace, and balance. When you are not centered, you are unclear, unfocused, stressed, and off balance.

A good centering technique will require only minimal attention, allowing you to keep some of your attention on the activity at hand such as washing dishes, folding laundry, or gardening. Be aware, though, that your family may be more tempted to interrupt if they see you doing something. Just explain to them that you are also meditating and that unless they want to help you do dishes, fold laundry, or garden, they should leave you alone for a few minutes. Here are some quickie centering techniques.

Simple Breath Awareness

While involved in whatever you are doing, bring some attention to your breathing for just a few moments… it needn’t be your full attention… just enough to bring you back to your calm center. Breathe naturally, or perhaps just a little more slowly and deeply.

Reclaiming Your Energy

When you are feeling stressed and scattered, take several slow, deep breaths. With each in-breath, imagine you are pulling all of your scattered energy and attention back to your inner self… your calm center.

Letting Go

This centering technique combines breath awareness with the phrase or mantra, “Let go.” It is especially helpful when you are tense and/or fixating on a stressful situation or a negative thought or emotion. As you inhale, say (silently or aloud), “Let”. As you exhale, say “go”… while letting go of all that is stressing you.

Relaxation Meditation

This remarkably easy and relaxing meditation makes use of a little-known secret about the eyes. Allowing the eyes to rest in a soft downward gaze has an instant, automatic relaxing effect.

Relaxation meditation provides a great deal of stress reduction and can be used as a quick 2 minute relax and refresh break almost anywhere (but not while driving). You will also realize a heightened sense of alertness.

Sit comfortably with your spine reasonably straight.

Allow your eyes to rest comfortably downward, gazing softly, but not focused on anything.

Without closing your eyes completely, let your eyelids drop to a level that feels most comfortable.

Continue gazing downward… the act of gazing is your primary focus (rather than the area at which you are gazing). You may notice your breathing becoming more rhythmic.

It’s OK to let your attention drift a bit. If your eyes become very heavy, it’s OK to let them close.

If you notice you’ve come out of your relaxed space, simply bring your attention back to your relaxed downward gaze.

Breathing Meditation

In this meditation, you will be focusing on your breath. This is probably one of the easiest methods of meditation to begin with.

Start by adopting a comfortable position. When you sit to meditate, sit comfortably, with your spine reasonably straight. This allows the spiritual energy to flow freely up the spine, which is an important aspect of meditation. Leaning against a chair back, a wall, headboard, etc. is perfectly all right. If, for physical reasons, you can’t sit up, lay flat on your back. Place your hands in any position that is comfortable.

Once you’re comfortable, close your eyes.

Start to notice your breathing. We breathe so often that we tend to take breathing for granted. So take the time to notice your breathing.

Notice the air filling your lungs.

Then notice as you breathe out and the air leaves your lungs. Repeat the process of noticing your breath.

As you do this, you’ll find thoughts coming up. They might be about family, friends, work or absolutely anything else. That doesn’t matter – it’s all part of the process and it is perfectly normal to continue to have thoughts whilst you are meditating.

But once these thoughts come up, let them drift out with your next breath. Each time your thoughts drift, bring your mind back to focusing on your breathing.

Walking Meditation

If you find it difficult to sit still and keep your eyes closed whilst meditating, then walking meditation could be good for you.

There are four components to a walking meditation:

Becoming aware of your breathing

Noticing your surroundings

Being conscious and attentive to your body’s movement

Taking some time to reflect on your meditation experience

Become aware of your breathing in much the same way as you would for the breathing meditation process. Notice each breath as you breathe in and then breathe out again.

Become conscious of the air filling your lungs and use each exhalation to send out any distracting thoughts.

When you start noticing your surroundings, you’ll likely be amazed. We take lots of things for granted in our everyday life and much of what is around us goes completely unnoticed. When you are walking around, notice the different colors that you see.

Don’t just notice colors. Listen for sounds. There may be bird song, road noise or the chatter of people or animals. Consciously tune in to these different sounds. Notice the different tunes sung by the birds.

If you are in an urban area, pay attention to the different traffic noises. Each car’s engine sounds slightly different. So does the sound of wheels on the different street surfaces. You’ll find yourself hearing things that have merely passed you by before.

There are also smells to fill your senses. Maybe the aroma of freshly mown grass or the sweet smell that occurs just after a shower of rain. There are plenty of smells in the atmosphere and the chances are that most of these have slipped past your consciousness.

Tune into your body’s movement. Start to notice the light pressure on the soles of your feet as you walk. Be aware of the air brushing your skin, whether it’s a calm day or a windy one. Pay attention to your body’s movement as you walk around. Feel how your arms swing. Notice how you hold your head – is it upright and attentive or a different position? Switch your attention to different body parts as you are walking and you’ll be fascinated at what you find.

Once you’ve completed your walking meditation, take a small amount of time to come back to your normal world. During this period, mentally run through your thoughts and feelings that you experienced during your meditation time. Think what you can do to enhance your experience even further next time you choose to do a walking meditation.

Gradually come back from your peaceful site to your regular world.

Universal Mantra Meditation

This meditation comes from an ancient Indian text called the Malini Vijaya Tantra, which dates back about 5000 years. It is a very easy meditation, yet very powerful in its capacity to quiet your mind and connect you with your Essence or Inner Spirit.

This meditation uses a mantra as your object of focus. A mantra is a word or phrase that has the power to catalyze a shift into deeper, more peaceful states of awareness. The mantra most use for this meditation is: Aum. Aum does not have a literal translation. Rather, it is the essential vibration of the universe. If you were to tune into the actual sound of the cosmos, the perpetual sound of Aummm is what you would hear.

Although this mantra is sometimes chanted aloud, in this meditation, you will be repeating the mantra mentally… silently.

Before we get to the actual steps, there are a few important points to be aware of:

One of the keys to this meditation is repeating the mantra gently or faintly in your mind.

The power of this technique comes from letting go and allowing your attention to dive into the deeper realms of awareness.

Therefore, even though you will be focusing on the mantra, staying focused on the mantra is not the aim of this meditation.

Trying too hard to stay focused would keep your attention from descending into the deeper realms. Instead, you will be repeating the mantra with “minimal effort”, and giving your mind the space to wander a bit.

Resist the temptation to make something happen, and allow the mantra to do the work.

This meditation easily produces a shift into deeper, more peaceful states of awareness. (The degree of this will vary from session to session.) It increases the flow of energy to the brain and clears away a good deal of physical and emotional toxins.

Because of this detoxification, it is best to keep this meditation to 10 or 15 minutes a day when first beginning. After a month or so, it can be increased to 20 minutes, but that should be the maximum for anyone who does not have quite a few years of meditation experience. Also, it is advisable to drink a lot of pure water.

Finally, mantra meditation accelerates spiritual growth as you achieve a state of relaxation and self-awareness.

Sit comfortably, with your eyes closed and your spine reasonably straight.

Begin repeating the mantra gently in your mind.

Repeat the mantra at whatever tempo feels most natural. There is no need to synchronize the mantra with your breathing, but if this occurs naturally, it’s ok.

Allow the mantra to arise more faintly in your mind… repeating it with minimal effort.

Continue repeating the mantra faintly, and allow for whatever happens.

If at any time, you feel that you are slipping into a sleep-like or dream-like state, allow it to happen.

If and when you notice that your attention has drifted completely off the mantra, gently begin repeating it again, and continue with minimal effort.

After 10 or 15 minutes, stop repeating the mantra, and come out of your meditation slowly.

After any meditation technique, allow yourself a moment to savor the sense of floating and calm that surrounds you. Take a deep breath, gird your loins (figuratively), and venture forth into your daily rounds with renewed energy and a deep sense of peace.

Sara Dillinger is an Elder in the United Methodist Church, currently on leave of absence. She has sixteen years experience serving churches with predominantly Baby Boomer or older members. For more information of interest to Boomers, check out her website at: [http://www.for-boomers.com]

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Zen Meditations For A Happy Mind And Body

Zen meditations are the lifeline of today’s hectic and stressful world. It’s not wrong to say that if you want to hold on to your sanity, hold on to the meditation techniques!

This particular form of meditation involves sitting in particular postures and bringing the mind and body to a stable and peaceful condition. It induces a deeper sense of self-awareness and makes you discover your inner strength. In layman terms, you simply sit without distracting yourself and focus on the thoughts and images that come to your mind. With time, your heart rate reduces and your breathing gets shallow. You are now in a reflective state of meditation.

By the use of deliberation and concentration, you produce a synergy that unites your body, mind, and soul. As you practice meditation on a regular basis, the energy required for synergizing the three aspects of your being is achieved. During your meditation sessions, your mind is aware of only the present moment. There is no past or future. Thus, there are neither painful emotions from the past nor worries about what’s going to happen next, which are the main causes of stress and tensions in everyday life.

While in a meditative state, your mind reacts only to the present. Thus, you have no thoughts. Your mind with utmost calmness and peace is free.

Interested in trying Zen meditation, but don’t know where to start? Well, here are certain steps to help you get started…

  • Become aware of your breathing.
  • Focus when you inhale and exhale deeply. You will experience a sense of peace at this time.
  • As you inhale, think about your whole body. By doing this, you calm your entire body.
  • As you exhale, think about each part of your body, beginning from your shoulders. Relax them one by one. By doing this, you empathize on all your body needs.
  • Relax the muscles of your face one by one.
  • Concentrate on your body and relax any muscles that are tense.
  • When you take in the air, think about happiness; the happiness of being alive, of hearing, seeing, and breathing.
  • Practice and practice until you become the master of your body and mind.

Zen meditation induces stillness of mind. The techniques are so designed that they get rid of all unnecessary thoughts from your mind, including the negative ones, and give you emotional and mental peace.

I hope you found these tips helpful! To uncover some shocking truths about meditation retreats, and to discover the benefits of using meditation bells, please go to: http://www.OnlineMeditationGuru.com/

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How to Meditate Deeply For Peace of Mind

Our crazy daily reality almost mandates that we know how to meditate deeply for peace of mind. Think about it: We’re on the go almost from the time we open our eyes in the morning until the time we finally can grab MAYBE a few hours of unrestful sleep at night. Can that possibly be a healthy or sustainable thing? Most people would answer in the negative.

What can we do, then? Well, there are several methods for gaining a little peace of mind and tranquility through meditation. Even if we’re only able to do so for a few minutes out of our busy lives, it might be that we find much longer-lasting benefits if we’re consistent about the practice.

First of all, decide on which form of meditation you’d like to try. The simplest and easiest to do normally revolves around a kind of breathing process that is combined with a simultaneous “focus” on some external object or thought. Commonly, that object is a point in between the eyebrows. If you’re uncomfortable with closing your eyes, try to focus on a fixed point directly in front of you.

This is the basic mechanism. Let’s look at the physical steps that should take place. Take a moment to find a quiet place. Sit or lie down in a comfortable position. A chair is fine, as long as it’s not putting any stress on your body. Make sure your posture is good and your spine is straight. Then, close your eyes and begin breathing deeply, in and out and slowly and rhythmically. Don’t concentrate on any one single thought, but let them come and go without struggle. Try to do this for ten minutes or so, if you can.

The physical act of meditation can help the body to release helpful and calming chemicals known as endorphins. This is a benefit to just about any person. Also, relaxing breathing will help you figuratively clear the mind of needless distraction and unhelpful thought processes. Do all these things regularly, and you should be pleased with the results.

Find the quickest way to meditate deeply and check out this Brain Evolution System review.

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